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The #32leadershipskills you need in 2021

This series is intended to anyone wishing to become a better leader. Each week, we will open our knowledge about leadership in the digital era.

We address leadership as a broad topic with internal and external challenges. Leadership is everyday actions and long term commitment that define us as human. Leadership can be focused on individuals or collective.

There are as many leadership styles as there are leaders, but certain skills and values make great leaders. We want to offer our take what those are, and how you can start improving as a leader right now. These might spark fundamental changes in your thinking, but will also include concrete day-to-day tips anyone can take advantage of.

1. Deliver what you promise

Reliability is a feature you can’t overlook if you want to be a great leader. Good leaders solve problems rather than create them. A good leader takes away stress from their subordinates as well as their bosses. Delivering what you promise makes you valuable as a leader as well as an employee.

Though this might seem obvious, in practice it can be surprisingly difficult. We are increasingly invested in dozens of projects and are asked tons of small or large tasks to complete. Business world today is a hectic exchange floor of favors. When people know they can rely on you with the small things, they will rely on you with the large.

With Fingertip, you can create tasks in a few clicks, set deadlines, and complete them systematically with ease. Kanban boards highlight the prioritized tasks and visualize them in a pleasant way. Fingertip shows a work queue of tasks you have due next, so you’ll never miss a deadline. Use Fingertip and deliver what you promise.

1

 

Deliver what you promise

“When people know they can rely on you with the small things, they will rely on you with the large.”

 

#32leadershipskills

1. Deliver what you promise

Reliability is a feature you can’t overlook if you want to be a great leader. Good leaders solve problems rather than create them. A good leader takes away stress from their subordinates as well as their bosses. Delivering what you promise makes you valuable as a leader as well as an employee.

Though this might seem obvious, in practice it can be surprisingly difficult. We are increasingly invested in dozens of projects and are asked tons of small or large tasks to complete. Business world today is a hectic exchange floor of favors. When people know they can rely on you with the small things, they will rely on you with the large.

With Fingertip, you can create tasks in a few clicks, set deadlines, and complete them systematically with ease. Kanban boards highlight the prioritized tasks and visualize them in a pleasant way. Fingertip shows a work queue of tasks you have due next, so you’ll never miss a deadline. Use Fingertip and deliver what you promise.

2

 

Be decisive in turbulence

“If you let things brew, they will eventually boil over. Uncertain situations escalate to bad times if you don’t seize control.”

 

#32leadershipskills

2. Be decisive in turbulence

Every leader encounters uncertainty, but the best leaders thrive in it. Often, an organization might slow down and dwell in indecisiveness when the unthinkable occurs. A good leader grabs hold of an incapacitated team by holding decision making authority to themselves to get over the bump and regain working order.

Collective decision making practices are becoming commonplace, and knowledge workers expect to have power in team decisions starting from entry level positions. But during a crisis, when are competing opinions, and the arguments become an endless loop, it is important a leader shows their capability of taking over. If you let things brew, they will eventually boil over. Uncertain situations escalate to bad times if you don’t seize control.

How do you do it? Give the ultimate decision, set a direction moving forward and establish boundaries if a future situation occurs impacting performance. Fingertip allows you to set up collaborative decisions where you have the final say. Set a deadline to the decision so arguments don’t have time to start repeating, clearly communicate the made decision and create objectives and tasks to get back to work.

2. Be decisive in turbulence

Every leader encounters uncertainty, but the best leaders thrive in it. Often, an organization might slow down and dwell in indecisiveness when the unthinkable occurs. A good leader grabs hold of an incapacitated team by holding decision making authority to themselves to get over the bump and regain working order.

Collective decision making practices are becoming commonplace, and knowledge workers expect to have power in team decisions starting from entry level positions. But during a crisis, when are competing opinions, and the arguments become an endless loop, it is important a leader shows their capability of taking over. If you let things brew, they will eventually boil over. Uncertain situations escalate to bad times if you don’t seize control.

How do you do it? Give the ultimate decision, set a direction moving forward and establish boundaries if a future situation occurs impacting performance. Fingertip allows you to set up collaborative decisions where you have the final say. Set a deadline to the decision so arguments don’t have time to start repeating, clearly communicate the made decision and create objectives and tasks to get back to work.

3. Learn from failures

If you don’t make mistakes, have you taken any risks? Have you tried to put yourself in positions of uncertainty? High rewards are often only available through high risks, and this involves making the odd mistake every once in a while.

While we can’t avoid making mistakes, we should be able to take every ounce of learning available. Bad leaders repeat the same mistakes, good leaders learn from their mistakes, and great leaders also learn from mistakes of others.

Being able to acknowledge mistakes as opportunities to learn is a brilliant characteristic for any leader. But how can you actually make the most out of mistakes? Well, for starters you can consider: What did we expect to happen? What did we fail to take into account? What skills or knowledge were we lacking? What wrong assumptions did we make?

With a few simple questions, you can easily process the mistake and move on. Documenting the causes is easy with Fingertip. Use Fingertip as the system of record for past decisions, tasks and objectives, and come up with better ways to handle uncertain situations together. Learn and improve so you never make the same mistakes again.

3

 

Learn from failures

“While we can’t avoid making mistakes, we should be able to take every ounce of learning available.”

 

#32leadershipskills

3. Learn from failures

If you don’t make mistakes, have you taken any risks? Have you tried to put yourself in positions of uncertainty? High rewards are often only available through high risks, and this involves making the odd mistake every once in a while.

While we can’t avoid making mistakes, we should be able to take every ounce of learning available. Bad leaders repeat the same mistakes, good leaders learn from their mistakes, and great leaders also learn from mistakes of others.

Being able to acknowledge mistakes as opportunities to learn is a brilliant characteristic for any leader. But how can you actually make the most out of mistakes? Well, for starters you can consider: What did we expect to happen? What did we fail to take into account? What skills or knowledge were we lacking? What wrong assumptions did we make?

With a few simple questions, you can easily process the mistake and move on. Documenting the causes is easy with Fingertip. Use Fingertip as the system of record for past decisions, tasks and objectives, and come up with better ways to handle uncertain situations together. Learn and improve so you never make the same mistakes again.

4

 

Resolving conflicts

“A de-escalating approach to conflict where all opinions have equal opportunity to be told might be extremely healthy”

 

#32leadershipskills

4. Resolving conflicts

While we spend loads of time ensuring our teams have high cohesion and people get along, we can’t avoid conflicts in business. Values and opinions can’t – and shouldn’t – match a 100% in organizations, so conflicts are bound to happen.

What sets apart great leadership is how conflicts are resolved. Conflicts can induce change and, in many cases, progress. Escaping the conflict or going into full blown arguments hurts our companies, but a de-escalating approach where all opinions have equal opportunity to be told is usually extremely healthy for company culture. Mature conflict resolution also correlates with much valued psychological safety.

How do you resolve conflicts? For starters, level the playing field. Either act as an objective mediator or let people write down their thoughts (Fingertip can be very useful tool for that). Try and make people understand each others position. De-personalize and equalize the opinions since they are the conflicting issue. Understanding these opinions helps everyone involved to develop their own mindset and take others into account better in the future, improving future collaboration and customer experience as well.

4. Resolving conflicts

While we spend loads of time ensuring our teams have high cohesion and people get along, we can’t avoid conflicts in business. Values and opinions can’t – and shouldn’t – match a 100% in organizations, so conflicts are bound to happen.

What sets apart great leadership is how conflicts are resolved. Conflicts can induce change and, in many cases, progress. Escaping the conflict or going into full blown arguments hurts our companies, but a de-escalating approach where all opinions have equal opportunity to be told is usually extremely healthy for company culture. Mature conflict resolution also correlates with much valued psychological safety.

How do you resolve conflicts? For starters, level the playing field. Either act as an objective mediator or let people write down their thoughts (Fingertip can be very useful tool for that). Try and make people understand each others position. De-personalize and equalize the opinions since they are the conflicting issue. Understanding these opinions helps everyone involved to develop their own mindset and take others into account better in the future, improving future collaboration and customer experience as well.

5. Inspire by example

As a leader, your subordinates will look at you often. To see how you react to success and failure, how you communicate with your superiors, what values you uphold. You can compare it to a child copying their older siblings. By example you set the team’s standards. Acknowledging that allows you to use it to your organization’s advantage.

If you sweep mistakes under the rug, so will your subordinates. Documenting all your activities and decisions in Fingertip consistently will motivate your team to follow. Being honest and vulnerable in front of your team allows them to do the same. Showing consistency in the example you set reduces stress and improves psychological safety. If you say something and do the other, it will seem unimportant.

Being mindful about the consistent example you set allows you to manifest the same behavior in your team. Inspire, excite, and spread enthusiasm by walking the walk. Great leaders breed followership. With followers, its easier to reach your common goals.

5

 

Inspire by example

“Showing consistency in the example you set reduces stress and improves psychological safety. “

 

#32leadershipskills

5. Inspire by example

As a leader, your subordinates will look at you often. To see how you react to success and failure, how you communicate with your superiors, what values you uphold. You can compare it to a child copying their older siblings. By example you set the team’s standards. Acknowledging that allows you to use it to your organization’s advantage.

If you sweep mistakes under the rug, so will your subordinates. Documenting all your activities and decisions in Fingertip consistently will motivate your team to follow. Being honest and vulnerable in front of your team allows them to do the same. Showing consistency in the example you set reduces stress and improves psychological safety. If you say something and do the other, it will seem unimportant.

Being mindful about the consistent example you set allows you to manifest the same behavior in your team. Inspire, excite, and spread enthusiasm by walking the walk. Great leaders breed followership. With followers, its easier to reach your common goals.

6

 

Recognize and avoid burnout

“If you fail to care for your own well-being, who will be there to take care of your employees?”

 

#32leadershipskills

6. Recognize and avoid burnout

Good leaders are at a high risk of burnout. The tendency to always be there for your team, take the bullet of a late-night deadline might make your subordinates like you, but it might just wear you out. If you fail to care for your own well-being, who will be there to take care of your employees?

We see burnout far too often paralyze the capabilities of organizations, often attributable to sheer sense of duty. It’s important a leader has their sight keen on signs of burnout not only for their team, but themselves as well. Loss of motivation, reduced sense of ability and regular tiredness may all be signs that someone is approaching the limits of their capacity.

How to combat burnout then? Separate work from leisure. Be empathetic. Set an example of logging off. But is there a way to notice burnout while working from home? Documenting tasks transparently in tools like Fingertip and ensuring that people log off from their status indicators are ways remote leaders can improve health among their team members.

Don’t foster a culture that idolizes overworking, and your organization will reap the fruits in the long term.

6. Recognize and avoid burnout

Good leaders are at a high risk of burnout. The tendency to always be there for your team, take the bullet of a late-night deadline might make your subordinates like you, but it might just wear you out. If you fail to care for your own well-being, who will be there to take care of your employees?

We see burnout far too often paralyze the capabilities of organizations, often attributable to sheer sense of duty. It’s important a leader has their sight keen on signs of burnout not only for their team, but themselves as well. Loss of motivation, reduced sense of ability and regular tiredness may all be signs that someone is approaching the limits of their capacity.

How to combat burnout then? Separate work from leisure. Be empathetic. Set an example of logging off. But is there a way to notice burnout while working from home? Documenting tasks transparently in tools like Fingertip and ensuring that people log off from their status indicators are ways remote leaders can improve health among their team members.

Don’t foster a culture that idolizes overworking, and your organization will reap the fruits in the long term.

7. Take feedback (and own it)

Leaders don’t shy away from criticism. They accept whatever comes their way, analyze the root cause and do all in their power to fix things.

As a leader, you will be watched by many. You can – and you should – use it as an advantage, and ask the people observing you for feedback. Whether a project succeeds or fails, requesting personal comments shows that you are willing to admit you aren’t perfect, and that you are willing to change to improve.

Fingertip utilizes a triple-loop learning model to give us more chances to reflect on personal performance. We can rate individual input with sliders during any process, every project closes with a chance to discuss what went well and what was lacking, and long-term statistics uncover our personal habits of decision making and leadership. To complement that, we should check the pulse individually with our close team members or project partners as well.

Turn your weaknesses into strengths by cultivating feedback from people around you. Start from yourself and apply the same to your entire organization.

7

 

Take feedback (and own it)

“Requesting personal comments shows that you are willing to admit you aren’t perfect.”

 

#32leadershipskills

7. Take feedback (and own it)

Leaders don’t shy away from criticism. They accept whatever comes their way, analyze the root cause and do all in their power to fix things.

As a leader, you will be watched by many. You can – and you should – use it as an advantage, and ask the people observing you for feedback. Whether a project succeeds or fails, requesting personal comments shows that you are willing to admit you aren’t perfect, and that you are willing to change to improve.

Fingertip utilizes a triple-loop learning model to give us more chances to reflect on personal performance. We can rate individual input with sliders during any process, every project closes with a chance to discuss what went well and what was lacking, and long-term statistics uncover our personal habits of decision making and leadership. To complement that, we should check the pulse individually with our close team members or project partners as well.

Turn your weaknesses into strengths by cultivating feedback from people around you. Start from yourself and apply the same to your entire organization.

8

 

Engage people in
remote work

“What we can safely say, is that everyone deals with working remotely differently.”

 

#32leadershipskills

8. Engage people in remote work

Leadership remotely can easily become a source of anxiety. Are my team members doing well? Are they getting the support they need? Are they getting anything done? There are also team factors: lack of informal communication and knowledge sharing, and the unrelatedness from being away from others.

What we can safely say, is that everyone deals with working remotely differently. To make team dynamics work, it is important for a leader to approach team members personally without requiring everyone to work the same way. Open and honest communication is a key factor. Creating informal encounters for example by allowing chit-chat in the beginning of video calls helps create the sense of togetherness that is extremely important in remote work.

It’s equally important to create momentum around critical, daily team processes. Applying digital leadership tools, like Fingertip, is a way to ensure things get done. They engage people in making collaborative decisions, setting goals, and having visibility to each other work queues, all adding up to building higher commitment. Fingertip creates an asynchronous channel to improve business communication wherever and whenever your remote team members are working.

8. Engage people in remote work

Leadership remotely can easily become a source of anxiety. Are my team members doing well? Are they getting the support they need? Are they getting anything done? There are also team factors: lack of informal communication and knowledge sharing, and the unrelatedness from being away from others.

What we can safely say, is that everyone deals with working remotely differently. To make team dynamics work, it is important for a leader to approach team members personally without requiring everyone to work the same way. Open and honest communication is a key factor. Creating informal encounters for example by allowing chit-chat in the beginning of video calls helps create the sense of togetherness that is extremely important in remote work.

It’s equally important to create momentum around critical, daily team processes. Applying digital leadership tools, like Fingertip, is a way to ensure things get done. They engage people in making collaborative decisions, setting goals, and having visibility to each other work queues, all adding up to building higher commitment. Fingertip creates an asynchronous channel to improve business communication wherever and whenever your remote team members are working.

9. Encourage feedback culture

Leading a culture that encourages actionable, encouraging feedback is necessary for an organization to improve and gain situational awareness. The two most common mistakes in feedback are only sharing positive comments and getting too personal.

Positive comments do motivate and make us feel appreciated, but they hide behind the mistakes that we then repeat. Some people are also brutally honest in pointing out other peoples’ mistakes, being often unable to put themselves in their shoes, which creates unnecessary conflicts and reduces collaboration.

Leaders should steer the feedback culture to a healthy middle. Praising the efforts of individuals but being critical and transparent also of the failures. Leaders want to encourage a culture where people care about their performance and seek out their own weaknesses to improve. Organizations that allow failing and give time and space for individuals to develop their weaknesses enjoy high physical safety and lower employee turnaround.

Fingertip is a great way to shorten the feedback loop and create more accurate situational awareness. It allows people to give low threshold feedback for decision making processes, objective setting and meetings. Criticism ties to single work iterations, making it a learning experience rather than personal scolding.

Fingertip makes disagreeing easier, so resilience and ability to give harsh feedback grows and allows more chances to improve. Criticism is also caring, and Fingertip makes it easier to collect.

9

 

Encourage feedback culture

“Leaders want to encourage a culture where people care about their performance and seek out their own weaknesses to improve.”

 

#32leadershipskills

9. Encourage feedback culture

Leading a culture that encourages actionable, encouraging feedback is necessary for an organization to improve and gain situational awareness. The two most common mistakes in feedback are only sharing positive comments and getting too personal.

Positive comments do motivate and make us feel appreciated, but they hide behind the mistakes that we then repeat. Some people are also brutally honest in pointing out other peoples’ mistakes, being often unable to put themselves in their shoes, which creates unnecessary conflicts and reduces collaboration.

Leaders should steer the feedback culture to a healthy middle. Praising the efforts of individuals but being critical and transparent also of the failures. Leaders want to encourage a culture where people care about their performance and seek out their own weaknesses to improve. Organizations that allow failing and give time and space for individuals to develop their weaknesses enjoy high physical safety and lower employee turnaround.

Fingertip is a great way to shorten the feedback loop and create more accurate situational awareness. It allows people to give low threshold feedback for decision making processes, objective setting and meetings. Criticism ties to single work iterations, making it a learning experience rather than personal scolding.

Fingertip makes disagreeing easier, so resilience and ability to give harsh feedback grows and allows more chances to improve. Criticism is also caring, and Fingertip makes it easier to collect.

10

 

Question your beliefs and recognize prejudice

“Heuristics can be beneficial to come up with the right answers and solutions faster, but we need to understand when we use them.”

 

#32leadershipskills

10. Question your beliefs and recognize prejudice

We all have our own social circles, creating our unique set of echo chambers. It is extremely important for a leader to understand the vastness of thoughts and experience also outside of these “bubbles”, to improve our decision making and problem solving capabilities.

Don’t get us wrong. Heuristics, prejudice and thought patterns can be beneficial to come up with the right answers and solutions faster, but we need to be able to be able to understand when and how we use them. It requires complex thinking to separate ourselves from our own thoughts, and which of them can be pinpointed to certain experiences and beliefs. Surrounding us with people of different ages and backgrounds expands the collection of ideas we can draw from in creative knowledge work and leadership.

Fingertip can help us separate these thoughts and help us reflect with other leaders on our side. It promotes sharing our thoughts and explaining the thought patterns we had behind them, and using transparent discussions to expand on other ideas, or safely criticize the process, allowing us all to recognize our own prejudices a little bit better.

10. Question your beliefs and recognize prejudice

We all have our own social circles, creating our unique set of echo chambers. It is extremely important for a leader to understand the vastness of thoughts and experience also outside of these “bubbles”, to improve our decision making and problem solving capabilities.

Don’t get us wrong. Heuristics, prejudice and thought patterns can be beneficial to come up with the right answers and solutions faster, but we need to be able to be able to understand when and how we use them. It requires complex thinking to separate ourselves from our own thoughts, and which of them can be pinpointed to certain experiences and beliefs. Surrounding us with people of different ages and backgrounds expands the collection of ideas we can draw from in creative knowledge work and leadership.

Fingertip can help us separate these thoughts and help us reflect with other leaders on our side. It promotes sharing our thoughts and explaining the thought patterns we had behind them, and using transparent discussions to expand on other ideas, or safely criticize the process, allowing us all to recognize our own prejudices a little bit better.

11. Accept your own vulnerability

In the recent past, being a leader was all about being resilient, being able to deliver, and looking as though we make as few mistakes as possible. A leader was the rock everyone else could lean into in thick and thin. Nowadays, the environment has changed.

While hierarchies have become more lenient, also soft skills and psychological safety have been focus areas for organizations. Younger generations currently entering the workforce are looking for happier workplaces, and a clear connection has been made to being able to show one’s mistakes and vulnerabilities without fear of repercussions.

If a leader is hiding their vulnerabilities, they are messaging their team members that they shouldn’t have any either. This is often faked yet causes immense stress among workers. Good leaders acknowledge the mistakes they make and aren’t trying to always be the smartest person in the room.

Fingertip is a collaborative approach to leadership that utilizes the best knowledge in decision making and guides us to more transparent communication. It’s a hub for co-organization and leadership that documents the steps in our thinking, so we can reflect back and learn. Sharing our ideas early is scary while it exposes our vulnerabilities, but as an organization it makes us more honest, open and agile.

11

 

Accept your own vulnerability

“If a leader is hiding their vulnerabilities, they are messaging their team members that they shouldn’t have any either.”

 

#32leadershipskills

11. Accept your own vulnerability

In the recent past, being a leader was all about being resilient, being able to deliver, and looking as though we make as few mistakes as possible. A leader was the rock everyone else could lean into in thick and thin. Nowadays, the environment has changed.

While hierarchies have become more lenient, also soft skills and psychological safety have been focus areas for organizations. Younger generations currently entering the workforce are looking for happier workplaces, and a clear connection has been made to being able to show one’s mistakes and vulnerabilities without fear of repercussions.

If a leader is hiding their vulnerabilities, they are messaging their team members that they shouldn’t have any either. This is often faked yet causes immense stress among workers. Good leaders acknowledge the mistakes they make and aren’t trying to always be the smartest person in the room.

Fingertip is a collaborative approach to leadership that utilizes the best knowledge in decision making and guides us to more transparent communication. It’s a hub for co-organization and leadership that documents the steps in our thinking, so we can reflect back and learn. Sharing our ideas early is scary while it exposes our vulnerabilities, but as an organization it makes us more honest, open and agile.

12

 

Take responsibility for your team

“Good leaders own the result, learn from it and work on delivering in the future.”

 

#32leadershipskills

12. Take responsibility for your team

A leaders first priority should be their team. That’s why leaders who throw their teammates under the bus are sure to lose trust rather quickly. A leader is ultimately the last accountable that work gets done and taking the responsibility for the shortcomings of their team is a sign of leadership.

Of course, the reasons behind failures and mistakes should be addressed, but to higher-ups the leader takes the accountability and thanks their team for making the effort. They own the result, learn from it and work on delivering in the future.

Leaders who take responsibility contribute to a high psychological safety in their team members. They create followers, who will be more honest and open in the workplace, which helps speed up collaboration. People share their ideas more, and people contribute collectively more to leadership processes.

Fingertip makes it easy to share our progress with the rest of our team and increases communication in critical processes. It makes us recognize our mistakes earlier, and encourages to ask for help, improving the cohesion and trust across our teams. Above all, it creates responsibility and clear roles, making us all the owners of our teams’ performance.

12. Take responsibility for your team

A leaders first priority should be their team. That’s why leaders who throw their teammates under the bus are sure to lose trust rather quickly. A leader is ultimately the last accountable that work gets done and taking the responsibility for the shortcomings of their team is a sign of leadership.

Of course, the reasons behind failures and mistakes should be addressed, but to higher-ups the leader takes the accountability and thanks their team for making the effort. They own the result, learn from it and work on delivering in the future.

Leaders who take responsibility contribute to a high psychological safety in their team members. They create followers, who will be more honest and open in the workplace, which helps speed up collaboration. People share their ideas more, and people contribute collectively more to leadership processes.

Fingertip makes it easy to share our progress with the rest of our team and increases communication in critical processes. It makes us recognize our mistakes earlier, and encourages to ask for help, improving the cohesion and trust across our teams. Above all, it creates responsibility and clear roles, making us all the owners of our teams’ performance.

13. Sharing the spotlight

Leaders should be able to understand what their team members do and know, but is there a need for leader to be the best from a substance perspective? At anything really? It’s hard to share praise if you simultaneously think you would have done a better job.

Leaders must also be able to recognize when someone has exceeded what was expected of them or tried their hand at something they are inexperienced with, but passionate about. It creates a positive feedback loop and reinforces the tendency to try new things and learn.

Being the center of attention for something you have succeeded in is a great feeling, and a leader should try to create those moments regularly for all the people they work with. Getting appreciated boosts trust in oneself and keeps up motivation. Of course, too much is too much also for praise, and it starts to suffer from inflation in too large amounts, while also seeming artificial.

In Fingertip, roles and responsibilities are clear. It is easy to see who has stepped up in leadership and accountability, as well as who has been bringing world-class substance know-how to the table. Sharing even small feats with small praises here and there is simple and keeps the mood and motivation high.

13

 

Sharing the spotlight

“Getting appreciated boosts trust in oneself and keeps up motivation.”

 

#32leadershipskills

13. Sharing the spotlight

Leaders should be able to understand what their team members do and know, but is there a need for leader to be the best from a substance perspective? At anything really? It’s hard to share praise if you simultaneously think you would have done a better job.

Leaders must also be able to recognize when someone has exceeded what was expected of them or tried their hand at something they are inexperienced with, but passionate about. It creates a positive feedback loop and reinforces the tendency to try new things and learn.

Being the center of attention for something you have succeeded in is a great feeling, and a leader should try to create those moments regularly for all the people they work with. Getting appreciated boosts trust in oneself and keeps up motivation. Of course, too much is too much also for praise, and it starts to suffer from inflation in too large amounts, while also seeming artificial.

In Fingertip, roles and responsibilities are clear. It is easy to see who has stepped up in leadership and accountability, as well as who has been bringing world-class substance know-how to the table. Sharing even small feats with small praises here and there is simple and keeps the mood and motivation high.

14

 

Stay confident during setbacks

“Occasional setbacks are unavoidable. How we react to them is up to us.”

 

#32leadershipskills

14. Stay confident during setbacks

Once upon a time, a portfolio manager realized they had made a mistake costing their company two million dollars. Absolutely devastated, they gathered courage to tell their supervisor, absolutely sure to get fired. In the end they knew they had to be honest and shared the unfortunate event. Their bosses reply? “You have just spent two million dollars on your own training. Carry on.” Though maybe just an urban legend, it contains an important learning point for leaders.

Occasional setbacks are unavoidable. How we react to them is up to us. If a leader loses their composure during a blow, their whole team will suffer. A true leaders charges towards challenges without worrying about mistakes or failures, seeing them as chances to gain experience and resilience.

We can also approach setbacks with a clear process. Staying calm when we realize the situation, accepting that the milk has been spilled, stepping outside to analyze the setback in a bigger picture, taking away the learnings, and minimizing risks and negative outcomes as soon as we know how.

Fingertip creates a good basis for a leader’s situation room, helping you do exactly that: See the big picture, document the errors and react accordingly to avoid risks and making the same mistakes twice. Fingertip can be used to transparently document all past experiences, so you can also learn from others’ experiences. It helps you stay composed and collected through any major or minor setback in your career.

14. Stay confident during setbacks

Once upon a time, a portfolio manager realized they had made a mistake costing their company two million dollars. Absolutely devastated, they gathered courage to tell their supervisor, absolutely sure to get fired. In the end they knew they had to be honest and shared the unfortunate event. Their bosses reply? “You have just spent two million dollars on your own training. Carry on.” Though maybe just an urban legend, it contains an important learning point for leaders.

Occasional setbacks are unavoidable. How we react to them is up to us. If a leader loses their composure during a blow, their whole team will suffer. A true leaders charges towards challenges without worrying about mistakes or failures, seeing them as chances to gain experience and resilience.

We can also approach setbacks with a clear process. Staying calm when we realize the situation, accepting that the milk has been spilled, stepping outside to analyze the setback in a bigger picture, taking away the learnings, and minimizing risks and negative outcomes as soon as we know how.

Fingertip creates a good basis for a leader’s situation room, helping you do exactly that: See the big picture, document the errors and react accordingly to avoid risks and making the same mistakes twice. Fingertip can be used to transparently document all past experiences, so you can also learn from others’ experiences. It helps you stay composed and collected through any major or minor setback in your career.

15. Always be learning

A leader has to accept that they are not the best at everything. Surrounding yourself with people who are smarter than you is actually a great way to grow. “Never be the smartest person in a room, else you’re just wasting your time.” A true leader is always yearning to learn from those around them.

We all have heard that making mistakes is a good way to learn, but a great leader learns also from other people’s experiences. Learning itself is strengthened in action, with feedback from those exposed to our leadership. Fingertip offers a great, transparent documentation tool for leadership, where we can all learn from each other. It also allows us to get comments on our own performance faster, digitally.

In a triple loop learning model, those experiences and feedback make us reflect on three things: What do we value as a company, how they reflect on assumptions we make to operate daily, and how our every day activities translate to results? Critical assessment of all three is fundamental for organizational learning.

Learning allows us to address and change our behavior knowingly. Changing how we think and do things takes time, but after we assume those better practices as habits, they will soon be engrained in our company culture as well. A constantly learning organization is a successful one, and that’s why you should try to make learning an essential part of your culture.

15

 

Always be learning

“A constantly learning organization is a successful one.”

 

#32leadershipskills

15. Always be learning

A leader has to accept that they are not the best at everything. Surrounding yourself with people who are smarter than you is actually a great way to grow. “Never be the smartest person in a room, else you’re just wasting your time.” A true leader is always yearning to learn from those around them.

We all have heard that making mistakes is a good way to learn, but a great leader learns also from other people’s experiences. Learning itself is strengthened in action, with feedback from those exposed to our leadership. Fingertip offers a great, transparent documentation tool for leadership, where we can all learn from each other. It also allows us to get comments on our own performance faster, digitally.

In a triple loop learning model, those experiences and feedback make us reflect on three things: What do we value as a company, how they reflect on assumptions we make to operate daily, and how our every day activities translate to results? Critical assessment of all three is fundamental for organizational learning.

Learning allows us to address and change our behavior knowingly. Changing how we think and do things takes time, but after we assume those better practices as habits, they will soon be engrained in our company culture as well. A constantly learning organization is a successful one, and that’s why you should try to make learning an essential part of your culture.

Do you want to improve your leadership, collaboration, and communication in Microsoft Teams? I can help.

Book a meeting

Milla Nevanlinna

CRO, Fingertip
e: milla@fingertip.fi
p: +358 40 5473566

Milla Nevanlinna

CRO, Fingertip
e: milla@fingertip.fi
p: +358 40 5473566

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